Booze News

 

A Toast to the House, but Challenges Lie Ahead

FEBRUARY 27, 2015 | by DAWN TOGUCHI

On Thursday, the Pennsylvania House of Representatives passed liquor privatization legislation sponsored by Speaker of the House Mike Turzai. We applaud the House for acting in the best interests of taxpayers and consumers and again recognizing that the vast majority of Pennsylvanians—no matter their political leanings—want government out of the liquor business.

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Not in the Holiday Spirit(s)

DECEMBER 3, 2013 | by DAWN TOGUCHI

If you like a good deal, nothing beats shopping during the holidays. Sales, coupons, early bird specials…retailers do whatever it takes to get an edge over their competition, all to shoppers’ delight. But what if you have no competition? What if, say, you’re a government-run liquor monopoly?

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A Band-Aid for Broken PLCB

NOVEMBER 12, 2013 | by BOB DICK

Real reform of the PLCB means getting the government out of both the wholesale and retail side of liquor, thereby allowing entrepreneurs, not bureaucrats, to serve the needs of businesses and consumers. 

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Liquor Privatization Saves Lives? Part II

OCTOBER 28, 2013 | by DAWN TOGUCHI

Public safety improved in Washington state after liquor store privatization. As further data comes in, the results continue to impress: Most state alcohol-related arrests continue to decline. DUI collisions and charges for “minor in possession” both improved following privatization.

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Podcast: House Offers Compromise Language on Liquor Bill

OCTOBER 8, 2013 | by JOHN BOUDER

Public support for liquor privatization is as strong as ever, as our recent survey makes clear. So what’s happening with legislation that hit a snag in the Senate this spring?

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Getting Rich off the Government Liquor Monopoly

OCTOBER 3, 2013 | by NATHAN BENEFIELD

Joe Conti has a new gig—lobbying for the union representing state liquor store workers, UFCW.  The UFCW recently put a million dollars into anti-privatization ads, paid for with taxpayer-collected union dues, so it's not shocker they would hire another high-price lobbyist. 

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